Spreading Happy founder, Sarah Connor, recently won a grant to see her vision of SH’s positive message series on billboards, with the first round in Sydney funded by The Happy Project, and Spreading Happy community supporters through Pozible crowdfunding.

We’re looking forward to the first billboards hitting Sydney very soon!
When it launches, you can follow and share using the hashtag #just4happy.

In the meantime, here is the project’s backstory.

from Pozible:

The story of the project

After taking to the streets with friends and holding up positive posters to passers-by and seeing peoples happy reactions, I had the Idea to implement these positive posters on a more permanent basis – on billboards and advertising spaces!People were truly moved by our positive signs and I believe having these happy slogans on billboards will lift the spirits of those who read them and perhaps when they continue their day and pass others by, they in turn will lift their spirits…then maybe, just maybe, the whole city could be lifted….if only for a moment.
See more of the campaign here.
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from Adelaide Now:

Sarah Connor launches Spreading Happy as we celebrate International Day of Happiness

INSPIRING: Sarah Connor and Spreading Happy members Lakota Gibbons, Dylan Markwick. Taisha Reed, Darcy Storm take to the streets. Picture: Mike Burton

INSPIRING: Sarah Connor and Spreading Happy members Lakota Gibbons, Dylan Markwick. Taisha Reed, Darcy Storm take to the streets. Picture: Mike Burton

The 29 year old from Millswood is behind the “Spreading Happy” group — a posse of orange onesie clad South Australians who take to Adelaide’s major intersections to hold up signs of hope and inspiration.

Ms Connor began the personal passion around three years ago, an idea borne from her former job as Terry the Termite — a hyperactive insect who waves to drivers outside Goodwood Road’s Termimesh company.

“I got addicted to making people smile on their boring commute to and from work so I hired myself in my spare time,” Ms Connor said.

“It started with me and a mate and then other friends wanted to get involved then we launched it on Facebook and lots of people expressed their interest (in being involved).’’

And the positive response the group has encountered — from drivers yelling out ‘thank you’ to Facebook feedback that the simple gesture has helped people out of a tough time has launched a new phase — “The Happy Billboard Project”.

See more from the article here.